latex formatting

latex formatting

latex formatting

In your first steps with LaTeX, you may not have seen why LaTeX is better than the word processor you are used to. (If you have some typesetting experience, however, you may have noticed how nicely LaTeX justifies lines and how clever LaTeX is about hyphenating words.) Where LaTeX really shines is the formatting of mathematical equations. Indeed, the program TeX that underlies LaTeX was created by Donald E. Knuth, a mathematician and computer scientist, with the needs of mathematicians in mind.
Equations come in two flavors: short in-line equations that do not interrupt the paragraph, and displayed equations that are printed on a separate line. In the LaTeX source file, all mathematical formulas are enclosed between special delimiters that signal LaTeX to switch to its special mathematics mode.

As with all text, there are times when you want to change how it is aligned. By default Latex justifies all your text so that it lines up on both the left and right margins.
The environment begin

. end
is used to centre the text (note the American spelling). Each line is centred individually. This tends to make the paragraph look ugly and hard to read, but it is useful for centring figures, tables etc. Inside another environment you can use centering . Sometimes the command centerline<> can be useful; this command centres everything in its argument.

References:

http://www-users.york.ac.uk/~pjh503/LaTeX/formatting.html
http://www.masterclass.com/articles/how-to-format-a-book-manuscript

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